O. Winston Link s Steam Locomotive. - The New York Times

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By the late 1950s, steam engines in this country were careening along the tracks for their last runs. Automobiles and planes had overhauled the way Americans traveled, and the train industry had been transitioning from steam engines to diesel going back to the 1930s. Most of the steam engines still operating were part of the Norfolk and Western Railway, headquartered in Roanoke, with routes that ran through America’s Coal Country — Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, among them. In fact, the N&W had been carrying coal for so long that the railway executives were pained to put trains running on coal out of commission.

Still, the train industry had foreseen its fate, and no one could save the steam engines. But there was one man who could keep them from vanishing.

The publication this month of “ Life Along the Line: A Photographic Portrait of America’s Last Great Steam Railroad ” (Abrams) by O. Winston Link, which coincides with a new exhibition at the O. Winston Link Museum in Roanoke, offers jubilant cause to celebrate the mechanical majesty of these trains — and the landscape they left behind.

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By the late 1950s, steam engines in this country were careening along the tracks for their last runs. Automobiles and planes had overhauled the way Americans traveled, and the train industry had been transitioning from steam engines to diesel going back to the 1930s. Most of the steam engines still operating were part of the Norfolk and Western Railway, headquartered in Roanoke, with routes that ran through America’s Coal Country — Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, among them. In fact, the N&W had been carrying coal for so long that the railway executives were pained to put trains running on coal out of commission.

Still, the train industry had foreseen its fate, and no one could save the steam engines. But there was one man who could keep them from vanishing.

The publication this month of “ Life Along the Line: A Photographic Portrait of America’s Last Great Steam Railroad ” (Abrams) by O. Winston Link, which coincides with a new exhibition at the O. Winston Link Museum in Roanoke, offers jubilant cause to celebrate the mechanical majesty of these trains — and the landscape they left behind.

Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

Would you like to tell us about a lower price ?
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Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

Would you like to tell us about a lower price ?
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By the late 1950s, steam engines in this country were careening along the tracks for their last runs. Automobiles and planes had overhauled the way Americans traveled, and the train industry had been transitioning from steam engines to diesel going back to the 1930s. Most of the steam engines still operating were part of the Norfolk and Western Railway, headquartered in Roanoke, with routes that ran through America’s Coal Country — Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, among them. In fact, the N&W had been carrying coal for so long that the railway executives were pained to put trains running on coal out of commission.

Still, the train industry had foreseen its fate, and no one could save the steam engines. But there was one man who could keep them from vanishing.

The publication this month of “ Life Along the Line: A Photographic Portrait of America’s Last Great Steam Railroad ” (Abrams) by O. Winston Link, which coincides with a new exhibition at the O. Winston Link Museum in Roanoke, offers jubilant cause to celebrate the mechanical majesty of these trains — and the landscape they left behind.

As one of the premier rare book sites on the Internet, Alibris has thousands of rare books, first editions, and signed books available.

With one of the largest book inventories in the world, find the book you are looking for. To help, we provided some of our favorites.

With an active marketplace of over 175 million items , use the Alibris Advanced Search Page to find any item you are looking for.

The 2018 Kegley Lecture Series of the Historical Society of Western Virginia will start with a talk by Rob Freis on William Mahone, soldier, railroad executive and U.S. senator, on Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 7 p.m. Freis, a writer of history, is a copy editor at The Roanoke Times. This talk and other lectures this year will be at Christ Lutheran Church. Admission is free for members and $5 for non-members; light refreshments will be served. We hope to see you there!

Due to inclement weather and questionable road conditions, the O. Winston Link & History Museum of Western Virginia will be closed today. Everyone please stay safe out there!

The Historical Society of Western Virginia says goodbye to Louise F. Kegley, who until her death Jan. 6 was the last surviving member of the original board of the Society. The Historical Society celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, and Louise and her husband, George Kegley, have supported the organization for its entire existence.



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O. Winston Link: Life Along the Line: A Photographic.

Posted by 2018 article

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