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Have you ever wondered what two-year-olds are doing when they flip through the pages of a board book, staring intently at each illustration? What about a four-year-old who scrawls seemingly meaningless strings of letters on a page, and then asks you to read them back to her? These behaviors are all part of emergent literacy , the phase during which children who cannot yet read and write are exploring what reading and writing are all about.

Jackie is a preschool teacher who thinks supporting children as they develop through emergent literacy is one of the most important aspects of her job. Jackie knows that having a print-rich environment, giving space for children to play with language, and teaching songs and rhymes are a few key strategies during emergent literacy. Yet nothing is as important to her as reading aloud to children. In this lesson, Jackie will discuss the significance of the read-aloud in supporting emergent literacy.

Jackie reads to her young students whenever she can. She shares the books that she loves most: classics from her own childhood as well as more recently published works. As she reads, she lets her students express any feelings or ideas that come up. Often, children bring in books their parents have read to them, and Jackie shares these books with the class. This aspect of emergent literacy has to do with the development of a love for reading. By modeling an adult relationship to literacy connected with love, community, and emotion, teachers can show their youngest students that books are things to love, to get lost in. Few literary interactions are as full of love as the read-aloud.

Have you ever wondered what two-year-olds are doing when they flip through the pages of a board book, staring intently at each illustration? What about a four-year-old who scrawls seemingly meaningless strings of letters on a page, and then asks you to read them back to her? These behaviors are all part of emergent literacy , the phase during which children who cannot yet read and write are exploring what reading and writing are all about.

Jackie is a preschool teacher who thinks supporting children as they develop through emergent literacy is one of the most important aspects of her job. Jackie knows that having a print-rich environment, giving space for children to play with language, and teaching songs and rhymes are a few key strategies during emergent literacy. Yet nothing is as important to her as reading aloud to children. In this lesson, Jackie will discuss the significance of the read-aloud in supporting emergent literacy.

Jackie reads to her young students whenever she can. She shares the books that she loves most: classics from her own childhood as well as more recently published works. As she reads, she lets her students express any feelings or ideas that come up. Often, children bring in books their parents have read to them, and Jackie shares these books with the class. This aspect of emergent literacy has to do with the development of a love for reading. By modeling an adult relationship to literacy connected with love, community, and emotion, teachers can show their youngest students that books are things to love, to get lost in. Few literary interactions are as full of love as the read-aloud.

I am so thrilled  to team up with one of my favorite people – Amy from Raising Arrows !  Last week, Amy told me of her wonderful idea for ‘Listening Pages.’  I immediately knew it was a project I would love to work on.

The concept of these Pages is to keep little ones engaged in the church service on Sunday mornings – from singing to the sermon to prayer.

I am hosting the pages for children who are not yet reading, utilizing pictures instead of words.  You’ll also see a space on the side of the Page where your little one can practice writing the words if he chooses.

My sides hurt from making this list of funny chapter books for kids. I’m going to brag a little about my book list here. I hope you don’t mind. But there are a lot of funny books out there ( my kids seem to have a knack for finding them in the library ) and a lot of the books that make it onto “funny books” lists are either gross out books or are labeled “books for boys” ( don’t even get me started on that ). Now, there are some of those so-called potty humor books on this list, too but these are books that grown-ups will actually appreciate reading aloud ( for the most part, everyone is different, dontcha know ).

I hope I have included a laugh out loud book for everyone. There are soft chuckle books, knowing smile books, hearty laugh books, and snort-milk-out-your-nose books. I’ve separated them out into a few different categories to help keep the list more user-friendly. But no need to point out any typos. My fingers are exhausted. (Note: book covers and titles are affiliate links.)

Side note: I’ll let you in on a little secret: With all the series and sequels on this list it is not exactly 100 funny chapter books. It is actually much, more! Happy laughing!

Whether you are planning for family read aloud time at home, or for time in the classroom, the start of the school year is a great time to choose a few read aloud books for 4th grade.  I think you’ll enjoy this selection of books that will entertain your kids with gasps of surprise, giggles of laughter or white-knuckle gripping of the couch cushions. I have included chapter books that cover a variety of topics and which will encourage kids to learn about experiences different from their own.

Some of these 4th grade read alouds are funny, others are historical, some cover difficult topics, but they are all compelling and engaging. Although I’m calling this a book list for 4th graders, these books are appropriate for all kids over the age of 9,  so share them with your 5th, 6th and 7th graders, too! The books will be equally loved by kids, parents and teachers alike. ( P.S. More book lists at the end of this post. ) (Note: covers and titles are affiliate links.)


A Mango Shaped Space by Wendy Mass. Mia has synesthesia, a condition in which the 5 senses overlap. It can manifest itself in different ways. For Mia, sounds, letter and numbers all have colors. No one believes her and her neurodiversity causes her difficulty at school. She finally gets a name for her experience and meets others like her, but struggles with the death of her beloved cat, Mango. This book is sure to start all sorts of conversations about what it’s like to experience the world in a way outside the “normal.”

Have you ever wondered what two-year-olds are doing when they flip through the pages of a board book, staring intently at each illustration? What about a four-year-old who scrawls seemingly meaningless strings of letters on a page, and then asks you to read them back to her? These behaviors are all part of emergent literacy , the phase during which children who cannot yet read and write are exploring what reading and writing are all about.

Jackie is a preschool teacher who thinks supporting children as they develop through emergent literacy is one of the most important aspects of her job. Jackie knows that having a print-rich environment, giving space for children to play with language, and teaching songs and rhymes are a few key strategies during emergent literacy. Yet nothing is as important to her as reading aloud to children. In this lesson, Jackie will discuss the significance of the read-aloud in supporting emergent literacy.

Jackie reads to her young students whenever she can. She shares the books that she loves most: classics from her own childhood as well as more recently published works. As she reads, she lets her students express any feelings or ideas that come up. Often, children bring in books their parents have read to them, and Jackie shares these books with the class. This aspect of emergent literacy has to do with the development of a love for reading. By modeling an adult relationship to literacy connected with love, community, and emotion, teachers can show their youngest students that books are things to love, to get lost in. Few literary interactions are as full of love as the read-aloud.

I am so thrilled  to team up with one of my favorite people – Amy from Raising Arrows !  Last week, Amy told me of her wonderful idea for ‘Listening Pages.’  I immediately knew it was a project I would love to work on.

The concept of these Pages is to keep little ones engaged in the church service on Sunday mornings – from singing to the sermon to prayer.

I am hosting the pages for children who are not yet reading, utilizing pictures instead of words.  You’ll also see a space on the side of the Page where your little one can practice writing the words if he chooses.

Have you ever wondered what two-year-olds are doing when they flip through the pages of a board book, staring intently at each illustration? What about a four-year-old who scrawls seemingly meaningless strings of letters on a page, and then asks you to read them back to her? These behaviors are all part of emergent literacy , the phase during which children who cannot yet read and write are exploring what reading and writing are all about.

Jackie is a preschool teacher who thinks supporting children as they develop through emergent literacy is one of the most important aspects of her job. Jackie knows that having a print-rich environment, giving space for children to play with language, and teaching songs and rhymes are a few key strategies during emergent literacy. Yet nothing is as important to her as reading aloud to children. In this lesson, Jackie will discuss the significance of the read-aloud in supporting emergent literacy.

Jackie reads to her young students whenever she can. She shares the books that she loves most: classics from her own childhood as well as more recently published works. As she reads, she lets her students express any feelings or ideas that come up. Often, children bring in books their parents have read to them, and Jackie shares these books with the class. This aspect of emergent literacy has to do with the development of a love for reading. By modeling an adult relationship to literacy connected with love, community, and emotion, teachers can show their youngest students that books are things to love, to get lost in. Few literary interactions are as full of love as the read-aloud.

I am so thrilled  to team up with one of my favorite people – Amy from Raising Arrows !  Last week, Amy told me of her wonderful idea for ‘Listening Pages.’  I immediately knew it was a project I would love to work on.

The concept of these Pages is to keep little ones engaged in the church service on Sunday mornings – from singing to the sermon to prayer.

I am hosting the pages for children who are not yet reading, utilizing pictures instead of words.  You’ll also see a space on the side of the Page where your little one can practice writing the words if he chooses.

My sides hurt from making this list of funny chapter books for kids. I’m going to brag a little about my book list here. I hope you don’t mind. But there are a lot of funny books out there ( my kids seem to have a knack for finding them in the library ) and a lot of the books that make it onto “funny books” lists are either gross out books or are labeled “books for boys” ( don’t even get me started on that ). Now, there are some of those so-called potty humor books on this list, too but these are books that grown-ups will actually appreciate reading aloud ( for the most part, everyone is different, dontcha know ).

I hope I have included a laugh out loud book for everyone. There are soft chuckle books, knowing smile books, hearty laugh books, and snort-milk-out-your-nose books. I’ve separated them out into a few different categories to help keep the list more user-friendly. But no need to point out any typos. My fingers are exhausted. (Note: book covers and titles are affiliate links.)

Side note: I’ll let you in on a little secret: With all the series and sequels on this list it is not exactly 100 funny chapter books. It is actually much, more! Happy laughing!

Whether you are planning for family read aloud time at home, or for time in the classroom, the start of the school year is a great time to choose a few read aloud books for 4th grade.  I think you’ll enjoy this selection of books that will entertain your kids with gasps of surprise, giggles of laughter or white-knuckle gripping of the couch cushions. I have included chapter books that cover a variety of topics and which will encourage kids to learn about experiences different from their own.

Some of these 4th grade read alouds are funny, others are historical, some cover difficult topics, but they are all compelling and engaging. Although I’m calling this a book list for 4th graders, these books are appropriate for all kids over the age of 9,  so share them with your 5th, 6th and 7th graders, too! The books will be equally loved by kids, parents and teachers alike. ( P.S. More book lists at the end of this post. ) (Note: covers and titles are affiliate links.)


A Mango Shaped Space by Wendy Mass. Mia has synesthesia, a condition in which the 5 senses overlap. It can manifest itself in different ways. For Mia, sounds, letter and numbers all have colors. No one believes her and her neurodiversity causes her difficulty at school. She finally gets a name for her experience and meets others like her, but struggles with the death of her beloved cat, Mango. This book is sure to start all sorts of conversations about what it’s like to experience the world in a way outside the “normal.”

Ah, summer reading. Warmer days have begun and now is a good time to choose a few books to read  during the summer months. There are few things more pleasant than cracking open a book on a lovely, sunny day. Take a peek at these absolutely perfect summer read alouds.

My kids and I have picked out a stack of books to read aloud when we are lounging outdoors at the park or community garden.  If you are looking for some books to supplement your school’s summer reading list I hope this list provides you with a bit of inspiration. Some of these titles are actually new to me, others we have read before ( reading chapter books over and over is good! ), and some I’ve read, but haven’t yet introduced to the kids.

I chose these book for a variety of reasons. They don’t all have specific summer themes, but they all called out to me about the carefree adventures and magical inspiration that summer always promises. If you have young kids, take a look at my list of 50 chapter books to read aloud to preschoolers for further suggestions. If you don’t like to tote around a stack of books in your beach bag, I’ve noted which titles you can download to your e-reader. (Note: book covers and titles are affiliate links.)

Have you ever wondered what two-year-olds are doing when they flip through the pages of a board book, staring intently at each illustration? What about a four-year-old who scrawls seemingly meaningless strings of letters on a page, and then asks you to read them back to her? These behaviors are all part of emergent literacy , the phase during which children who cannot yet read and write are exploring what reading and writing are all about.

Jackie is a preschool teacher who thinks supporting children as they develop through emergent literacy is one of the most important aspects of her job. Jackie knows that having a print-rich environment, giving space for children to play with language, and teaching songs and rhymes are a few key strategies during emergent literacy. Yet nothing is as important to her as reading aloud to children. In this lesson, Jackie will discuss the significance of the read-aloud in supporting emergent literacy.

Jackie reads to her young students whenever she can. She shares the books that she loves most: classics from her own childhood as well as more recently published works. As she reads, she lets her students express any feelings or ideas that come up. Often, children bring in books their parents have read to them, and Jackie shares these books with the class. This aspect of emergent literacy has to do with the development of a love for reading. By modeling an adult relationship to literacy connected with love, community, and emotion, teachers can show their youngest students that books are things to love, to get lost in. Few literary interactions are as full of love as the read-aloud.

I am so thrilled  to team up with one of my favorite people – Amy from Raising Arrows !  Last week, Amy told me of her wonderful idea for ‘Listening Pages.’  I immediately knew it was a project I would love to work on.

The concept of these Pages is to keep little ones engaged in the church service on Sunday mornings – from singing to the sermon to prayer.

I am hosting the pages for children who are not yet reading, utilizing pictures instead of words.  You’ll also see a space on the side of the Page where your little one can practice writing the words if he chooses.

My sides hurt from making this list of funny chapter books for kids. I’m going to brag a little about my book list here. I hope you don’t mind. But there are a lot of funny books out there ( my kids seem to have a knack for finding them in the library ) and a lot of the books that make it onto “funny books” lists are either gross out books or are labeled “books for boys” ( don’t even get me started on that ). Now, there are some of those so-called potty humor books on this list, too but these are books that grown-ups will actually appreciate reading aloud ( for the most part, everyone is different, dontcha know ).

I hope I have included a laugh out loud book for everyone. There are soft chuckle books, knowing smile books, hearty laugh books, and snort-milk-out-your-nose books. I’ve separated them out into a few different categories to help keep the list more user-friendly. But no need to point out any typos. My fingers are exhausted. (Note: book covers and titles are affiliate links.)

Side note: I’ll let you in on a little secret: With all the series and sequels on this list it is not exactly 100 funny chapter books. It is actually much, more! Happy laughing!



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Posted by 2018 7 ANYTIME READ-ALOUDS Kindle Edition - amazon.com

Read-Aloud Books - Common Sense Media

Posted by 2018 article

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