Far From the Madding Crowd (2015) - Rotten Tomatoes

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The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Thomas Hardy was not the most dynamic novelist in English literature, but this sluggish 1967 film still does him a serious disservice.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Thomas Hardy was not the most dynamic novelist in English literature, but this sluggish 1967 film still does him a serious disservice.

We don't know Bathsheba's name the first time we see her in this book, but we do know that she's very fond of her own appearance. When Gabriel Oak watches her from across a field, the first thing he notices is that "a small swing looking-glass was disclosed [in her hand], in which she proceeded to survey herself attentively. She parted her lips, and smiled" (1.13). Or in other words, Bathsheba likes to look at herself in mirrors when she doesn't think anyone is watching. It's like checking yourself out in a window's reflection before realizing that there's someone on the other side of the window looking right at you. Awkward.

The thing that really gets Oak about Bathsheba's vanity is the sheer excess of it. It's one thing to look in a mirror to straighten your appearance, but he realizes right away that "[t]here was no necessity whatever for her looking in the glass. She did not adjust her hat, or pat her hair, or press a dimple into shape […]" (1.15). This vanity is something that continues to pop up later in the book, eventually leading Bathsheba to curse God for giving her such a beautiful face. 

Even though she's vain, Bathsheba is still a respectable character in this novel, mostly because of the way she is able to be so independent as a woman living in 19th-century England. We can see signs of this independence early on when Bathsheba decides to ride her horse like a man, with one leg dangling over either side of the saddle. To her aunt (and to most Victorians), this is a sexually scandalous thing to do. But Bathsheba confidently responds to any objections by saying, "I can ride on the other [saddle]: trust me" (2.31).

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Thomas Hardy was not the most dynamic novelist in English literature, but this sluggish 1967 film still does him a serious disservice.

We don't know Bathsheba's name the first time we see her in this book, but we do know that she's very fond of her own appearance. When Gabriel Oak watches her from across a field, the first thing he notices is that "a small swing looking-glass was disclosed [in her hand], in which she proceeded to survey herself attentively. She parted her lips, and smiled" (1.13). Or in other words, Bathsheba likes to look at herself in mirrors when she doesn't think anyone is watching. It's like checking yourself out in a window's reflection before realizing that there's someone on the other side of the window looking right at you. Awkward.

The thing that really gets Oak about Bathsheba's vanity is the sheer excess of it. It's one thing to look in a mirror to straighten your appearance, but he realizes right away that "[t]here was no necessity whatever for her looking in the glass. She did not adjust her hat, or pat her hair, or press a dimple into shape […]" (1.15). This vanity is something that continues to pop up later in the book, eventually leading Bathsheba to curse God for giving her such a beautiful face. 

Even though she's vain, Bathsheba is still a respectable character in this novel, mostly because of the way she is able to be so independent as a woman living in 19th-century England. We can see signs of this independence early on when Bathsheba decides to ride her horse like a man, with one leg dangling over either side of the saddle. To her aunt (and to most Victorians), this is a sexually scandalous thing to do. But Bathsheba confidently responds to any objections by saying, "I can ride on the other [saddle]: trust me" (2.31).

Thomas Hardy , (born June 2, 1840, Higher Bockhampton, Dorset, England—died January 11, 1928, Dorchester , Dorset), English novelist and poet who set much of his work in Wessex, his name for the counties of southwestern England .

Though architecture brought Hardy both social and economic advancement, it was only in the mid-1860s that lack of funds and declining religious faith forced him to abandon his early ambitions of a university education and eventual ordination as an Anglican priest. His habits of intensive private study were then redirected toward the reading of poetry and the systematic development of his own poetic skills. The verses he wrote in the 1860s would emerge in revised form in later volumes (e.g., “Neutral Tones,” “Retty’s Phases”), but when none of them achieved immediate publication, Hardy reluctantly turned to prose.

Wessex Tales (1888) was the first collection of the short stories that Hardy had long been publishing in magazines. His subsequent short-story collections are A Group of Noble Dames (1891), Life’s Little Ironies (1894), and A Changed Man (1913). Hardy’s short novel The Well-Beloved (serialized 1892, revised for volume publication 1897) displays a hostility to marriage that was related to increasing frictions within his own marriage.



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