BBC - Schools - Religion - Judaism

Posted by 2018 article


Even people who know little about the Bible likely can recount the story of Moses leading the Israelites from Egypt in an extraordinary exodus. In this interview, Carol Meyers, an archeologist and professor of religion at Duke University, reflects on the significance of the Moses narrative in ancient times, the role it plays in American history, and why it continues to resonate with us today.

Moses, captured here by the 17th-century Spanish artist Jusepe de Ribera, is an icon of leadership, piety, and liberation throughout western culture. Enlarge Photo credit: © SuperStock

Carol Meyers: Too often in modern western thinking we see things in terms of black and white, history or fiction, with nothing in between. But there are other ways of understanding how people have recorded events of their past. There's something called mnemohistory, or memory history, that I find particularly useful in thinking about biblical materials. It's not like the history that individuals may have of their own families, which tends to survive only a generation or two. Rather, it's a kind of collective cultural memory.

A round the world most people are aware of Moses, the individual who executed the plagues upon ancient Egypt and lend the Israelites to the land of Canaan or “the promised land” according to the Hebrew Scriptures. In addition, Moses wrote the down the commandments, laws, and regulations as a printed copy for the third dimension. From the beginning the commandments predominated the knowledge of The Spirit World.

Moses taught, “Do not Steal” a self-explanatory statement. The phrase means not to steal from anyone, despite many individuals in this world will take the temporary advantage to steal another person’s possessions. However, it is noticeable that Moses did not directly say, do not be greedy, do not be selfish, or do not complain. Instead, he taught this in the format of stories. He taught through stories concerning cultivating faith, the action of love, and acceptable behavior to have a close relationship with the Divine Source and the Sacred Spirits .

Moses wrote down the commandments regarding human behavior; he wrote the commandments within the rules and regulations concerning the temple law and priesthood law. Because of this, Moses’ writing style is unique. Considering that the Jewish Scribes tampered with the writings of Moses during the Babylonian exile—the results has produced a struggle to clearly comprehend the context of what Moses taught. The commandments referring to human behavior can be very difficult to comprehend because of the manipulation. The individual student will benefit to study the writings of Moses multiple times until the underlining context is taken to heart and completely understood.

As Passover rolls around again and Jews the world over retell the story of Moses’s big moment, it’s worth remembering that there are aspects of Moses that haven’t made it to the big screen or into public consciousness.

In the Bible, it is explained that his name is derived from the Hebrew word mashah, “to draw,” as in “to draw him from the waters of the Nile,” where he had been hidden as an infant.

Unfortunately, it is awfully hard to get from that verb to the name Moses, which would probably mean something like “the one who draws," which isn’t how the story goes.

There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion . [1] [2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views , texts , sanctified places , prophesies , ethics , or organizations , that relate humanity to the supernatural , transcendental , or spiritual .

There are an estimated 10,000 distinct religions worldwide, [9] but about 84% of the world's population is affiliated with one of the five largest religions, namely Christianity , Islam , Hinduism , Buddhism or forms of folk religion . [10] The religiously unaffiliated demographic includes those who do not identify with any particular religion, atheists and agnostics . While the religiously unaffiliated have grown globally, many of the religiously unaffiliated still have various religious beliefs. [11]

The study of religion encompasses a wide variety of academic disciplines, including theology , comparative religion and social scientific studies. Theories of religion offer various explanations for the origins and workings of religion.

Even people who know little about the Bible likely can recount the story of Moses leading the Israelites from Egypt in an extraordinary exodus. In this interview, Carol Meyers, an archeologist and professor of religion at Duke University, reflects on the significance of the Moses narrative in ancient times, the role it plays in American history, and why it continues to resonate with us today.

Moses, captured here by the 17th-century Spanish artist Jusepe de Ribera, is an icon of leadership, piety, and liberation throughout western culture. Enlarge Photo credit: © SuperStock

Carol Meyers: Too often in modern western thinking we see things in terms of black and white, history or fiction, with nothing in between. But there are other ways of understanding how people have recorded events of their past. There's something called mnemohistory, or memory history, that I find particularly useful in thinking about biblical materials. It's not like the history that individuals may have of their own families, which tends to survive only a generation or two. Rather, it's a kind of collective cultural memory.

Even people who know little about the Bible likely can recount the story of Moses leading the Israelites from Egypt in an extraordinary exodus. In this interview, Carol Meyers, an archeologist and professor of religion at Duke University, reflects on the significance of the Moses narrative in ancient times, the role it plays in American history, and why it continues to resonate with us today.

Moses, captured here by the 17th-century Spanish artist Jusepe de Ribera, is an icon of leadership, piety, and liberation throughout western culture. Enlarge Photo credit: © SuperStock

Carol Meyers: Too often in modern western thinking we see things in terms of black and white, history or fiction, with nothing in between. But there are other ways of understanding how people have recorded events of their past. There's something called mnemohistory, or memory history, that I find particularly useful in thinking about biblical materials. It's not like the history that individuals may have of their own families, which tends to survive only a generation or two. Rather, it's a kind of collective cultural memory.

A round the world most people are aware of Moses, the individual who executed the plagues upon ancient Egypt and lend the Israelites to the land of Canaan or “the promised land” according to the Hebrew Scriptures. In addition, Moses wrote the down the commandments, laws, and regulations as a printed copy for the third dimension. From the beginning the commandments predominated the knowledge of The Spirit World.

Moses taught, “Do not Steal” a self-explanatory statement. The phrase means not to steal from anyone, despite many individuals in this world will take the temporary advantage to steal another person’s possessions. However, it is noticeable that Moses did not directly say, do not be greedy, do not be selfish, or do not complain. Instead, he taught this in the format of stories. He taught through stories concerning cultivating faith, the action of love, and acceptable behavior to have a close relationship with the Divine Source and the Sacred Spirits .

Moses wrote down the commandments regarding human behavior; he wrote the commandments within the rules and regulations concerning the temple law and priesthood law. Because of this, Moses’ writing style is unique. Considering that the Jewish Scribes tampered with the writings of Moses during the Babylonian exile—the results has produced a struggle to clearly comprehend the context of what Moses taught. The commandments referring to human behavior can be very difficult to comprehend because of the manipulation. The individual student will benefit to study the writings of Moses multiple times until the underlining context is taken to heart and completely understood.

Even people who know little about the Bible likely can recount the story of Moses leading the Israelites from Egypt in an extraordinary exodus. In this interview, Carol Meyers, an archeologist and professor of religion at Duke University, reflects on the significance of the Moses narrative in ancient times, the role it plays in American history, and why it continues to resonate with us today.

Moses, captured here by the 17th-century Spanish artist Jusepe de Ribera, is an icon of leadership, piety, and liberation throughout western culture. Enlarge Photo credit: © SuperStock

Carol Meyers: Too often in modern western thinking we see things in terms of black and white, history or fiction, with nothing in between. But there are other ways of understanding how people have recorded events of their past. There's something called mnemohistory, or memory history, that I find particularly useful in thinking about biblical materials. It's not like the history that individuals may have of their own families, which tends to survive only a generation or two. Rather, it's a kind of collective cultural memory.

A round the world most people are aware of Moses, the individual who executed the plagues upon ancient Egypt and lend the Israelites to the land of Canaan or “the promised land” according to the Hebrew Scriptures. In addition, Moses wrote the down the commandments, laws, and regulations as a printed copy for the third dimension. From the beginning the commandments predominated the knowledge of The Spirit World.

Moses taught, “Do not Steal” a self-explanatory statement. The phrase means not to steal from anyone, despite many individuals in this world will take the temporary advantage to steal another person’s possessions. However, it is noticeable that Moses did not directly say, do not be greedy, do not be selfish, or do not complain. Instead, he taught this in the format of stories. He taught through stories concerning cultivating faith, the action of love, and acceptable behavior to have a close relationship with the Divine Source and the Sacred Spirits .

Moses wrote down the commandments regarding human behavior; he wrote the commandments within the rules and regulations concerning the temple law and priesthood law. Because of this, Moses’ writing style is unique. Considering that the Jewish Scribes tampered with the writings of Moses during the Babylonian exile—the results has produced a struggle to clearly comprehend the context of what Moses taught. The commandments referring to human behavior can be very difficult to comprehend because of the manipulation. The individual student will benefit to study the writings of Moses multiple times until the underlining context is taken to heart and completely understood.

As Passover rolls around again and Jews the world over retell the story of Moses’s big moment, it’s worth remembering that there are aspects of Moses that haven’t made it to the big screen or into public consciousness.

In the Bible, it is explained that his name is derived from the Hebrew word mashah, “to draw,” as in “to draw him from the waters of the Nile,” where he had been hidden as an infant.

Unfortunately, it is awfully hard to get from that verb to the name Moses, which would probably mean something like “the one who draws," which isn’t how the story goes.



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Posted by 2018 BBC - Religions - Judaism: Moses

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Posted by 2018 article

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