The Winter Palace and the Hermitage Museum

Posted by 2018 article


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    The Winter Palace ( Russian : Зи́мний дворе́ц ; IPA:  [ˈzʲimnʲɪj dvɐˈrʲɛts] ) in Saint Petersburg , Russia, was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian monarchs . Situated between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square , adjacent to the site of Peter the Great 's original Winter Palace, the present and fourth Winter Palace was built and altered almost continuously between the late 1730s and 1837, when it was severely damaged by fire and immediately rebuilt. [1] The storming of the palace in 1917 as depicted in Soviet paintings and Eisenstein 's 1927 film October became an iconic symbol of the Russian Revolution .

    The first Winter Palace was a modest building of two main floors under a slate roof. [8] It seems that Peter soon tired of the first palace, for in 1721, the second version of the Winter Palace was built under the direction of architect Georg Mattarnovy . Mattarnovy's palace, though still very modest compared to royal palaces in other European capitals, was on two floors above a rusticated ground floor, with a central projection underneath a pediment supported by columns. [9] It was here that Peter the Great died in 1725.

    The Winter Palace was not the only palace in the unfinished city, or even the most splendid, as Peter had ordered his nobles to construct residences and to spend half the year there. [10] This was an unpopular command; Saint Petersburg was founded upon a swamp, with little sunlight, and it was said only cabbages and turnips would grow there. It was forbidden to fell trees for fuel, so hot water was permitted just once a week. Only Peter's second wife, Empress Catherine , pretended to enjoy life in the new city. [10]

    We have more than 70 million property reviews, and they're all from real, verified guests. How does it work?

    • 1

      The Winter Palace ( Russian : Зи́мний дворе́ц ; IPA:  [ˈzʲimnʲɪj dvɐˈrʲɛts] ) in Saint Petersburg , Russia, was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian monarchs . Situated between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square , adjacent to the site of Peter the Great 's original Winter Palace, the present and fourth Winter Palace was built and altered almost continuously between the late 1730s and 1837, when it was severely damaged by fire and immediately rebuilt. [1] The storming of the palace in 1917 as depicted in Soviet paintings and Eisenstein 's 1927 film October became an iconic symbol of the Russian Revolution .

      The first Winter Palace was a modest building of two main floors under a slate roof. [8] It seems that Peter soon tired of the first palace, for in 1721, the second version of the Winter Palace was built under the direction of architect Georg Mattarnovy . Mattarnovy's palace, though still very modest compared to royal palaces in other European capitals, was on two floors above a rusticated ground floor, with a central projection underneath a pediment supported by columns. [9] It was here that Peter the Great died in 1725.

      The Winter Palace was not the only palace in the unfinished city, or even the most splendid, as Peter had ordered his nobles to construct residences and to spend half the year there. [10] This was an unpopular command; Saint Petersburg was founded upon a swamp, with little sunlight, and it was said only cabbages and turnips would grow there. It was forbidden to fell trees for fuel, so hot water was permitted just once a week. Only Peter's second wife, Empress Catherine , pretended to enjoy life in the new city. [10]

      During the 18th century, a marked change occurred in European royal architecture. The need for austere fortified residences subsided and a period of building great classical palaces began.

      The present palace is the fourth iteration, the first being the brainchild of Peter the Great . Like many European sovereigns, he was inspired by Louis XIV’s Versailles , and wanted to build a modern city with palaces that followed western fashions.

      Peter the Great’s aspirations for the Winter Palace were not to rival Versailles in size or splendor—that honor would fall to the Peterhof Palace —but to build a modest palace that reflected enlightened thinking.

      The Winter Palace, the Russian Empire's official residence in the 18th-20th centuries. Located in the heart of Saint Petersburg, this former imperial palace is now part of the Hermitage State Museum's complex. / Empress Maria Alexandrovna’s Crimson Cabinet

      The current building was constructed between 1754—1762 by the Italian architect Francesco Bartolomeo. Rastrelli in Elizabethan Baroque style. This term describes the Russian Baroque architectural style under Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1741-61) that includes elements of French Rococo in interiors. / Concert Hall

      Russian artist Eduard Gau illustrated in his watercolor paintings all of the splendor, brilliance, and opulence of the imperial palace’s interior. / The Great (Nicholas) Hall

      We have more than 70 million property reviews, and they're all from real, verified guests. How does it work?

      • 1

        We have more than 70 million property reviews, and they're all from real, verified guests. How does it work?

        • 1

          The Winter Palace ( Russian : Зи́мний дворе́ц ; IPA:  [ˈzʲimnʲɪj dvɐˈrʲɛts] ) in Saint Petersburg , Russia, was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian monarchs . Situated between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square , adjacent to the site of Peter the Great 's original Winter Palace, the present and fourth Winter Palace was built and altered almost continuously between the late 1730s and 1837, when it was severely damaged by fire and immediately rebuilt. [1] The storming of the palace in 1917 as depicted in Soviet paintings and Eisenstein 's 1927 film October became an iconic symbol of the Russian Revolution .

          The first Winter Palace was a modest building of two main floors under a slate roof. [8] It seems that Peter soon tired of the first palace, for in 1721, the second version of the Winter Palace was built under the direction of architect Georg Mattarnovy . Mattarnovy's palace, though still very modest compared to royal palaces in other European capitals, was on two floors above a rusticated ground floor, with a central projection underneath a pediment supported by columns. [9] It was here that Peter the Great died in 1725.

          The Winter Palace was not the only palace in the unfinished city, or even the most splendid, as Peter had ordered his nobles to construct residences and to spend half the year there. [10] This was an unpopular command; Saint Petersburg was founded upon a swamp, with little sunlight, and it was said only cabbages and turnips would grow there. It was forbidden to fell trees for fuel, so hot water was permitted just once a week. Only Peter's second wife, Empress Catherine , pretended to enjoy life in the new city. [10]

          During the 18th century, a marked change occurred in European royal architecture. The need for austere fortified residences subsided and a period of building great classical palaces began.

          The present palace is the fourth iteration, the first being the brainchild of Peter the Great . Like many European sovereigns, he was inspired by Louis XIV’s Versailles , and wanted to build a modern city with palaces that followed western fashions.

          Peter the Great’s aspirations for the Winter Palace were not to rival Versailles in size or splendor—that honor would fall to the Peterhof Palace —but to build a modest palace that reflected enlightened thinking.

          We have more than 70 million property reviews, and they're all from real, verified guests. How does it work?

          • 1

            The Winter Palace ( Russian : Зи́мний дворе́ц ; IPA:  [ˈzʲimnʲɪj dvɐˈrʲɛts] ) in Saint Petersburg , Russia, was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian monarchs . Situated between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square , adjacent to the site of Peter the Great 's original Winter Palace, the present and fourth Winter Palace was built and altered almost continuously between the late 1730s and 1837, when it was severely damaged by fire and immediately rebuilt. [1] The storming of the palace in 1917 as depicted in Soviet paintings and Eisenstein 's 1927 film October became an iconic symbol of the Russian Revolution .

            The first Winter Palace was a modest building of two main floors under a slate roof. [8] It seems that Peter soon tired of the first palace, for in 1721, the second version of the Winter Palace was built under the direction of architect Georg Mattarnovy . Mattarnovy's palace, though still very modest compared to royal palaces in other European capitals, was on two floors above a rusticated ground floor, with a central projection underneath a pediment supported by columns. [9] It was here that Peter the Great died in 1725.

            The Winter Palace was not the only palace in the unfinished city, or even the most splendid, as Peter had ordered his nobles to construct residences and to spend half the year there. [10] This was an unpopular command; Saint Petersburg was founded upon a swamp, with little sunlight, and it was said only cabbages and turnips would grow there. It was forbidden to fell trees for fuel, so hot water was permitted just once a week. Only Peter's second wife, Empress Catherine , pretended to enjoy life in the new city. [10]

            During the 18th century, a marked change occurred in European royal architecture. The need for austere fortified residences subsided and a period of building great classical palaces began.

            The present palace is the fourth iteration, the first being the brainchild of Peter the Great . Like many European sovereigns, he was inspired by Louis XIV’s Versailles , and wanted to build a modern city with palaces that followed western fashions.

            Peter the Great’s aspirations for the Winter Palace were not to rival Versailles in size or splendor—that honor would fall to the Peterhof Palace —but to build a modest palace that reflected enlightened thinking.

            The Winter Palace, the Russian Empire's official residence in the 18th-20th centuries. Located in the heart of Saint Petersburg, this former imperial palace is now part of the Hermitage State Museum's complex. / Empress Maria Alexandrovna’s Crimson Cabinet

            The current building was constructed between 1754—1762 by the Italian architect Francesco Bartolomeo. Rastrelli in Elizabethan Baroque style. This term describes the Russian Baroque architectural style under Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1741-61) that includes elements of French Rococo in interiors. / Concert Hall

            Russian artist Eduard Gau illustrated in his watercolor paintings all of the splendor, brilliance, and opulence of the imperial palace’s interior. / The Great (Nicholas) Hall

            The Winter Palace in St. Petersburg , Russia , is one of the greatest and largest palaces . It was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian Tsars . It was built on the shores of the Neva River between 1754 and 1762.

            Tsar Nicholas I , in the 19th century, was responsible for the palace's present appearance and layout. He made many changes to the interior of the palace, and was responsible for its complete rebuilding after the fire of 1837. [1]

            On 30 October 1917, the palace was declared to be part of the Hermitage Museum . Today, the palace, as part one of the world's most famous museums, attracts an annual 3.5 million visitors.



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The Winter Palace in St. Petersburg

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