A Greek Slave – Broadway Musical – Original | IBDB

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There is amazingly little in the way of published material discussing the development of dance in musical theatre. This essay cannot hope to make up for that inexplicable shortfall. Our goal is to offer a brief profile of how dance has become a key element in the musical story telling process, note important events and individuals, and quote some of the best scholarly works covering the subject.

If you are looking for more on this, one of the few books to discuss the musical aspects of Greco-Roman theatre is Martin Flynn's Musical: A Grand Tour (New York: Schirmer Books, 1997).

Thomas "Daddy" Rice sewed the seeds of minstrelsy when he blacked his face and performed "Jump, Jim Crow" in an exaggerated comic parody of African Americans -- well, at least a parody of the way white people thought blacks behaved. His dance routine was a combination of hardshoe (a heel-to-toe tap and spin technique that later evolved into tap) and the shuffle (loose-limbed steps that African American had developed as part of "levee dancing").

The Greek Slave modeled by Hiram Powers remains a widely popular subject for American collectors as it was in the mid-19th century. The marble sculpture, first exhibited in England in 1845, displayed an ideal figure with thoughts of the Greek War of Independence (1821-1832). Multiple factories presented their version of the Greek Slave including first, Minton and later Copeland.

Uploaded by [email protected] on April 24, 2008

The turning point in Roman drama came in 240 BCE , when a Greek-speaking slave living in Rome, Livius Andronicus , translated Homer's Odyssey into Latin. As it turned out, this was a watershed experience that inaugurated the Romans into a century-long fascination with Hellenic culture. In more ways than one, that moment in history constitutes the inception of Latin literature. But who was this Livius Andronicus and why were his adaptations of Greek literature so significant in the evolution of Roman civilization?

A freed slave, we are told, Livius Andronicus served in the house of the Livii, a noble family of Rome, from whom he took his name. As such, he probably came to Rome when he was still a child and, no doubt, grew up bilingual, putting him in an excellent position to bridge Greek and Latin civilization. Besides The Odyssey , his adaptations included several Greek tragedies, mostly from originals by Sophocles and Euripides ( Ajax , Andromeda , Danae , Tereus ), and also comedies adapted from unknown sources ( Gladiolus , Ludius ).

It's a fair question to ask why he did not write his own original works—indeed, the same could be posed for every Roman playwright whose works survive—and the answer must be that he considered it wasted effort to till a field when the world doled out free grain. In other words, why make a play when you can steal one? It was an age when copyright did not yet exist and it was considered neither illegal nor immoral, or even inadvisable, to adapt another's work.

There is amazingly little in the way of published material discussing the development of dance in musical theatre. This essay cannot hope to make up for that inexplicable shortfall. Our goal is to offer a brief profile of how dance has become a key element in the musical story telling process, note important events and individuals, and quote some of the best scholarly works covering the subject.

If you are looking for more on this, one of the few books to discuss the musical aspects of Greco-Roman theatre is Martin Flynn's Musical: A Grand Tour (New York: Schirmer Books, 1997).

Thomas "Daddy" Rice sewed the seeds of minstrelsy when he blacked his face and performed "Jump, Jim Crow" in an exaggerated comic parody of African Americans -- well, at least a parody of the way white people thought blacks behaved. His dance routine was a combination of hardshoe (a heel-to-toe tap and spin technique that later evolved into tap) and the shuffle (loose-limbed steps that African American had developed as part of "levee dancing").

The Greek Slave modeled by Hiram Powers remains a widely popular subject for American collectors as it was in the mid-19th century. The marble sculpture, first exhibited in England in 1845, displayed an ideal figure with thoughts of the Greek War of Independence (1821-1832). Multiple factories presented their version of the Greek Slave including first, Minton and later Copeland.

There is amazingly little in the way of published material discussing the development of dance in musical theatre. This essay cannot hope to make up for that inexplicable shortfall. Our goal is to offer a brief profile of how dance has become a key element in the musical story telling process, note important events and individuals, and quote some of the best scholarly works covering the subject.

If you are looking for more on this, one of the few books to discuss the musical aspects of Greco-Roman theatre is Martin Flynn's Musical: A Grand Tour (New York: Schirmer Books, 1997).

Thomas "Daddy" Rice sewed the seeds of minstrelsy when he blacked his face and performed "Jump, Jim Crow" in an exaggerated comic parody of African Americans -- well, at least a parody of the way white people thought blacks behaved. His dance routine was a combination of hardshoe (a heel-to-toe tap and spin technique that later evolved into tap) and the shuffle (loose-limbed steps that African American had developed as part of "levee dancing").

The Greek Slave modeled by Hiram Powers remains a widely popular subject for American collectors as it was in the mid-19th century. The marble sculpture, first exhibited in England in 1845, displayed an ideal figure with thoughts of the Greek War of Independence (1821-1832). Multiple factories presented their version of the Greek Slave including first, Minton and later Copeland.

Uploaded by [email protected] on April 24, 2008

There is amazingly little in the way of published material discussing the development of dance in musical theatre. This essay cannot hope to make up for that inexplicable shortfall. Our goal is to offer a brief profile of how dance has become a key element in the musical story telling process, note important events and individuals, and quote some of the best scholarly works covering the subject.

If you are looking for more on this, one of the few books to discuss the musical aspects of Greco-Roman theatre is Martin Flynn's Musical: A Grand Tour (New York: Schirmer Books, 1997).

Thomas "Daddy" Rice sewed the seeds of minstrelsy when he blacked his face and performed "Jump, Jim Crow" in an exaggerated comic parody of African Americans -- well, at least a parody of the way white people thought blacks behaved. His dance routine was a combination of hardshoe (a heel-to-toe tap and spin technique that later evolved into tap) and the shuffle (loose-limbed steps that African American had developed as part of "levee dancing").



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