Common Sense and its Meaning Today by. - Thomas Paine

Posted by 2018 article


Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

There are 139 NHLs in upstate New York , 13 on Long Island , and 114 within New York City (NYC). Three counties have ten or more NHLs: New York County ( Manhattan ) has 86; Westchester County , just north of NYC, has 18; and Erie County in western New York has 10. Twelve other counties have five to nine NHLs, eight have three or four, 27 counties have one or two, and the remaining twelve of the state's 62 counties have none. The first New York NHLs were eight designated on October 9, 1960; the latest was designated on March 13, 2013. The NHLs and other landmarks outside NYC are listed below; the NHLs in NYC are in this companion article .

Seven NHL sites are among the 20 National Park System historic areas in New York state. [4] The other 13 National Park Service areas are also historic landmark sites of national importance, but are already protected by Federal ownership and administration, so NHL designation is unnecessary. A list of these National Park Service areas that conserve historic sites in New York State is also provided. Finally, three former NHLs in the state are also listed.

The state of New York , exclusive of NYC, is home to 155 of these landmarks, which are tabulated here. Twenty-three of these are also State Historic Sites (SHS), and fourteen are National Park System areas; these designations are indicated in italics.

Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

There are 139 NHLs in upstate New York , 13 on Long Island , and 114 within New York City (NYC). Three counties have ten or more NHLs: New York County ( Manhattan ) has 86; Westchester County , just north of NYC, has 18; and Erie County in western New York has 10. Twelve other counties have five to nine NHLs, eight have three or four, 27 counties have one or two, and the remaining twelve of the state's 62 counties have none. The first New York NHLs were eight designated on October 9, 1960; the latest was designated on March 13, 2013. The NHLs and other landmarks outside NYC are listed below; the NHLs in NYC are in this companion article .

Seven NHL sites are among the 20 National Park System historic areas in New York state. [4] The other 13 National Park Service areas are also historic landmark sites of national importance, but are already protected by Federal ownership and administration, so NHL designation is unnecessary. A list of these National Park Service areas that conserve historic sites in New York State is also provided. Finally, three former NHLs in the state are also listed.

The state of New York , exclusive of NYC, is home to 155 of these landmarks, which are tabulated here. Twenty-three of these are also State Historic Sites (SHS), and fourteen are National Park System areas; these designations are indicated in italics.

When we think of important legal influences from America’s colonial and revolutionary period, we often first think of influential statesmen such as Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, authors of the Federalist Papers, or Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence.

There is another author who, while perhaps not regarded as a scholar of the same caliber as the above writers by today’s legal scholars, has written a piece of literature that has had an undeniably profound impact on the United States.

That author is Thomas Paine, and his piece of literature is the pamphlet Common Sense , which was published anonymously on January 10, 1776.

Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

There are 139 NHLs in upstate New York , 13 on Long Island , and 114 within New York City (NYC). Three counties have ten or more NHLs: New York County ( Manhattan ) has 86; Westchester County , just north of NYC, has 18; and Erie County in western New York has 10. Twelve other counties have five to nine NHLs, eight have three or four, 27 counties have one or two, and the remaining twelve of the state's 62 counties have none. The first New York NHLs were eight designated on October 9, 1960; the latest was designated on March 13, 2013. The NHLs and other landmarks outside NYC are listed below; the NHLs in NYC are in this companion article .

Seven NHL sites are among the 20 National Park System historic areas in New York state. [4] The other 13 National Park Service areas are also historic landmark sites of national importance, but are already protected by Federal ownership and administration, so NHL designation is unnecessary. A list of these National Park Service areas that conserve historic sites in New York State is also provided. Finally, three former NHLs in the state are also listed.

The state of New York , exclusive of NYC, is home to 155 of these landmarks, which are tabulated here. Twenty-three of these are also State Historic Sites (SHS), and fourteen are National Park System areas; these designations are indicated in italics.

When we think of important legal influences from America’s colonial and revolutionary period, we often first think of influential statesmen such as Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, authors of the Federalist Papers, or Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence.

There is another author who, while perhaps not regarded as a scholar of the same caliber as the above writers by today’s legal scholars, has written a piece of literature that has had an undeniably profound impact on the United States.

That author is Thomas Paine, and his piece of literature is the pamphlet Common Sense , which was published anonymously on January 10, 1776.

Glenn Beck recently had a segment on his show featuring a Thomas Paine impersonator — complete with authentic Brooklyn accent — who delivered a 2 minute commercial rant in support of today’s teabagging revolution. While I’m sure that Thomas Paine’s head would explode if he could witness today’s America, the idea that he’d agree with Glenn Beck and his merry band of anti-taxation teabaggers is beyond hilarious.

A good place for Beck to start would be Paine’s essay entitled “ Agrarian Justice ” which examines how to make our civilization more just and equitable. Beck would be shocked to learn that the essay claims that private property is the cause of evil and suffering in the world. And certainly Beck would begin pouring gasoline on everything in sight (perhaps even himself) when he discovers that the essay articulates a detailed plan whereby wealth would be redistributed from wealthy property owners to poor, landless Americans.

In the essay Paine argues that in order to understand how our civilization ought to be organized, it is helpful to understand its true nature and origins:

HistoryNet.com is brought to you by World History Group, the world's largest publisher of history magazines. HistoryNet.com contains daily features, photo galleries and over 5,000 articles originally published in our various magazines.

The American founder and Deist Thomas Paine did a great service for us in his investigation and writings on the hateful anti-Gentile teachings of Judaism. His important work should be common knowledge throughout the world.

Thank You, you, we, are learning the word, not the book !… as i have said previously, the beginning was the Hebrews, there was no jew, the jew came from Babylon when those in Judah were captured and brought under the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, when they RETURNED to Judah is the first time in the BOOK, they were called jews and jewish people because they took back that wicked Pagan worship The Talmud.
Many people think Jesus came because of the harsh rule of the Romans but this is not why, it was because his teachings has been perverted and perverted into a BOOK
You are learning fast and we thank for printing this holy fact of the word of God. I AM.when they ask who God is .

Gordon Duff        –    Jim W. Dean
Jonas Alexis        –    Ian Greenhalgh
Kevin Barrett       –    Bob Nichols
Preston James     –    Michael Shrimpton
Thorne Dreyer     –    Steve Robertson
Carol Duff           –    Johnny Punish
Sami Jadallah      –    Stuart Littlewood
Eric Gajewski       –   Jack Speer Williams
Gilad Atzmon

Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

There are 139 NHLs in upstate New York , 13 on Long Island , and 114 within New York City (NYC). Three counties have ten or more NHLs: New York County ( Manhattan ) has 86; Westchester County , just north of NYC, has 18; and Erie County in western New York has 10. Twelve other counties have five to nine NHLs, eight have three or four, 27 counties have one or two, and the remaining twelve of the state's 62 counties have none. The first New York NHLs were eight designated on October 9, 1960; the latest was designated on March 13, 2013. The NHLs and other landmarks outside NYC are listed below; the NHLs in NYC are in this companion article .

Seven NHL sites are among the 20 National Park System historic areas in New York state. [4] The other 13 National Park Service areas are also historic landmark sites of national importance, but are already protected by Federal ownership and administration, so NHL designation is unnecessary. A list of these National Park Service areas that conserve historic sites in New York State is also provided. Finally, three former NHLs in the state are also listed.

The state of New York , exclusive of NYC, is home to 155 of these landmarks, which are tabulated here. Twenty-three of these are also State Historic Sites (SHS), and fourteen are National Park System areas; these designations are indicated in italics.

When we think of important legal influences from America’s colonial and revolutionary period, we often first think of influential statesmen such as Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, authors of the Federalist Papers, or Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence.

There is another author who, while perhaps not regarded as a scholar of the same caliber as the above writers by today’s legal scholars, has written a piece of literature that has had an undeniably profound impact on the United States.

That author is Thomas Paine, and his piece of literature is the pamphlet Common Sense , which was published anonymously on January 10, 1776.

Glenn Beck recently had a segment on his show featuring a Thomas Paine impersonator — complete with authentic Brooklyn accent — who delivered a 2 minute commercial rant in support of today’s teabagging revolution. While I’m sure that Thomas Paine’s head would explode if he could witness today’s America, the idea that he’d agree with Glenn Beck and his merry band of anti-taxation teabaggers is beyond hilarious.

A good place for Beck to start would be Paine’s essay entitled “ Agrarian Justice ” which examines how to make our civilization more just and equitable. Beck would be shocked to learn that the essay claims that private property is the cause of evil and suffering in the world. And certainly Beck would begin pouring gasoline on everything in sight (perhaps even himself) when he discovers that the essay articulates a detailed plan whereby wealth would be redistributed from wealthy property owners to poor, landless Americans.

In the essay Paine argues that in order to understand how our civilization ought to be organized, it is helpful to understand its true nature and origins:

HistoryNet.com is brought to you by World History Group, the world's largest publisher of history magazines. HistoryNet.com contains daily features, photo galleries and over 5,000 articles originally published in our various magazines.

Thomas Paine was considered a very radical thinker in the 18th Century. He wrote a short book titled The Age of Reason. In his work The Age of Reason Paine attempted to convince the people to step away from such a literal interpretation of the bible and be more tolerant and even accepting of other religions. The following quote is from Thomas Paine’s “The Age of reason” and describes his opinions on religion, as well as his own religious beliefs.

“As several of my colleagues and others of my fellow-citizens of France have given me the example of making their voluntary and individual profession of faith, I also will make mine; and I do this with all that sincerity and frankness with which the mind of man communicates with itself. I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.  I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.”

Below is a video that discusses The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.
http://undergod.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000068

There are 139 NHLs in upstate New York , 13 on Long Island , and 114 within New York City (NYC). Three counties have ten or more NHLs: New York County ( Manhattan ) has 86; Westchester County , just north of NYC, has 18; and Erie County in western New York has 10. Twelve other counties have five to nine NHLs, eight have three or four, 27 counties have one or two, and the remaining twelve of the state's 62 counties have none. The first New York NHLs were eight designated on October 9, 1960; the latest was designated on March 13, 2013. The NHLs and other landmarks outside NYC are listed below; the NHLs in NYC are in this companion article .

Seven NHL sites are among the 20 National Park System historic areas in New York state. [4] The other 13 National Park Service areas are also historic landmark sites of national importance, but are already protected by Federal ownership and administration, so NHL designation is unnecessary. A list of these National Park Service areas that conserve historic sites in New York State is also provided. Finally, three former NHLs in the state are also listed.

The state of New York , exclusive of NYC, is home to 155 of these landmarks, which are tabulated here. Twenty-three of these are also State Historic Sites (SHS), and fourteen are National Park System areas; these designations are indicated in italics.

When we think of important legal influences from America’s colonial and revolutionary period, we often first think of influential statesmen such as Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, authors of the Federalist Papers, or Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence.

There is another author who, while perhaps not regarded as a scholar of the same caliber as the above writers by today’s legal scholars, has written a piece of literature that has had an undeniably profound impact on the United States.

That author is Thomas Paine, and his piece of literature is the pamphlet Common Sense , which was published anonymously on January 10, 1776.

Glenn Beck recently had a segment on his show featuring a Thomas Paine impersonator — complete with authentic Brooklyn accent — who delivered a 2 minute commercial rant in support of today’s teabagging revolution. While I’m sure that Thomas Paine’s head would explode if he could witness today’s America, the idea that he’d agree with Glenn Beck and his merry band of anti-taxation teabaggers is beyond hilarious.

A good place for Beck to start would be Paine’s essay entitled “ Agrarian Justice ” which examines how to make our civilization more just and equitable. Beck would be shocked to learn that the essay claims that private property is the cause of evil and suffering in the world. And certainly Beck would begin pouring gasoline on everything in sight (perhaps even himself) when he discovers that the essay articulates a detailed plan whereby wealth would be redistributed from wealthy property owners to poor, landless Americans.

In the essay Paine argues that in order to understand how our civilization ought to be organized, it is helpful to understand its true nature and origins:



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