Blue Beetle 2: The First Charlton Series -- All Stories.

Posted by 2018 article


Beyond that, Bedard brings in some new cast members, like Joey Gonzalez, set to be a high school jerk-face to Jaime Reyes like Flash Thompson was to poor puny Peter Parker. He also drops in a plethora of baddies, among them Warp, Plasmus, Phobia, and Brutale. Seasoned DC fans will be pleased to see the pages of this book so full of DC Universe characters, and newer readers coming to this book from Blue Beetle’s appearances on “Batman: The Brave and the Bold” or “Smallville” will find a world filled with wild, exciting new characters.

Rob Leigh brings the lettering feel from the last “Blue Beetle” series into this book, but this time out, the “scarab-speak” is nothing more than a fancier font. I’m personally hoping we get the scarab font as the scarab begins to interact more intensely with its host.

It had been weird, having the most frightening being on Earth (Or at least, that was common interpretation) sitting in your little sister's room, and drinking imaginary tea with your parents all the while holding up a conversation of unicorns with said little sister.

So then, out of the blue Batman and his mother, Bianca, began to talk about different things, such as parenting techniqes, and battle strategies, school work, and him joining the Team.

Batman hadn't looked at him weirdly when he started talking to himself, or more specifically Khaji-Da, and had been suprisingly good with his sister, tossing her up and down and drawing with her wall all the while talking to Jaime and his parents (Or just Bianca. Heaven knows she was the one wearing the pants in the relationship.)

Beyond that, Bedard brings in some new cast members, like Joey Gonzalez, set to be a high school jerk-face to Jaime Reyes like Flash Thompson was to poor puny Peter Parker. He also drops in a plethora of baddies, among them Warp, Plasmus, Phobia, and Brutale. Seasoned DC fans will be pleased to see the pages of this book so full of DC Universe characters, and newer readers coming to this book from Blue Beetle’s appearances on “Batman: The Brave and the Bold” or “Smallville” will find a world filled with wild, exciting new characters.

Rob Leigh brings the lettering feel from the last “Blue Beetle” series into this book, but this time out, the “scarab-speak” is nothing more than a fancier font. I’m personally hoping we get the scarab font as the scarab begins to interact more intensely with its host.

Beyond that, Bedard brings in some new cast members, like Joey Gonzalez, set to be a high school jerk-face to Jaime Reyes like Flash Thompson was to poor puny Peter Parker. He also drops in a plethora of baddies, among them Warp, Plasmus, Phobia, and Brutale. Seasoned DC fans will be pleased to see the pages of this book so full of DC Universe characters, and newer readers coming to this book from Blue Beetle’s appearances on “Batman: The Brave and the Bold” or “Smallville” will find a world filled with wild, exciting new characters.

Rob Leigh brings the lettering feel from the last “Blue Beetle” series into this book, but this time out, the “scarab-speak” is nothing more than a fancier font. I’m personally hoping we get the scarab font as the scarab begins to interact more intensely with its host.

It had been weird, having the most frightening being on Earth (Or at least, that was common interpretation) sitting in your little sister's room, and drinking imaginary tea with your parents all the while holding up a conversation of unicorns with said little sister.

So then, out of the blue Batman and his mother, Bianca, began to talk about different things, such as parenting techniqes, and battle strategies, school work, and him joining the Team.

Batman hadn't looked at him weirdly when he started talking to himself, or more specifically Khaji-Da, and had been suprisingly good with his sister, tossing her up and down and drawing with her wall all the while talking to Jaime and his parents (Or just Bianca. Heaven knows she was the one wearing the pants in the relationship.)

Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional superheroes who appear in a number of American comic books published by a variety of companies since 1939. The most recent of the companies to own rights to the Blue Beetle is DC Comics who bought the rights to the character in 1983, using the name for three distinct characters over the years.

The original Blue Beetle was created by Fox Comics and later owned by Charlton Comics . The first Beetle was Dan Garret (later spelled Dan Garrett ), who initially gained super powers from a special vitamin, which was later changed to gaining powers from a "sacred scarab". The original Blue Beetle was featured not only in his own comic but also a weekly radio serial .

The second Blue Beetle was created by Charlton and later taken over by DC Comics , the successor to Dan Garrett known as Ted Kord . Kord "jumped" to the DC Comics universe during the Crisis on Infinite Earths alongside a number of other Charlton Comics characters. The second Blue Beetle later starred in his own 24 issue comic. Kord never had any super powers but used science to create various devices to help him fight crime. He became a member of the Justice League of America and was later killed during DC Comics' Infinite Crisis cross over.



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