Dying love Poems - Modern Award-winning Dying love Poetry.

Posted by 2018 article


Hosting an event that takes the end of life or bereavement as its theme? Tell us about it and we'll help you promote it. 

Writer and broadcaster Clive James is "saying goodbye" through his poetry. Read Japanese Maple , James' poignant reflection on mortality and the glory of nature. 

Poetry can sometimes help in dealing with grief and loss. The poems here may bring solace and comfort. They may also put into words some of the most difficult and painful emotions and feelings associated with death and bereavement.

II. Safety Dear! of all happy in the hour, most blest He who has found our hid security, Assured in the dark tides of the world that rest, And heard our word, 'Who is so safe as we?' We have found safety with all things undying, The winds, and morning, tears of men and mirth, The deep night, and birds singing, and clouds flying, And sleep, and freedom, and the autumnal earth. We have built a house that is not for Time's throwing. We have gained a peace unshaken by pain for ever. War knows no power. Safe shall be my going, Secretly armed against all death's endeavour; Safe though all safety's lost; safe where men fall; And if these poor limbs die, safest of all.

III. The Dead Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead! There's none of these so lonely and poor of old, But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold. These laid the world away; poured out the red Sweet wine of youth; gave up the years to be Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene, That men call age; and those who would have been, Their sons, they gave, their immortality. Blow, bugles, blow! They brought us, for our dearth, Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain. Honour has come back, as a king, to earth, And paid his subjects with a royal wage; And Nobleness walks in our ways again; And we have come into our heritage.

IV. The Dead These hearts were woven of human joys and cares, Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth. The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs, And sunset, and the colours of the earth. These had seen movements, and heard music; known Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended; Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone; Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended. There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after, Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance, A width, a shining peace, under the night.

Hosting an event that takes the end of life or bereavement as its theme? Tell us about it and we'll help you promote it. 

Writer and broadcaster Clive James is "saying goodbye" through his poetry. Read Japanese Maple , James' poignant reflection on mortality and the glory of nature. 

Poetry can sometimes help in dealing with grief and loss. The poems here may bring solace and comfort. They may also put into words some of the most difficult and painful emotions and feelings associated with death and bereavement.

II. Safety Dear! of all happy in the hour, most blest He who has found our hid security, Assured in the dark tides of the world that rest, And heard our word, 'Who is so safe as we?' We have found safety with all things undying, The winds, and morning, tears of men and mirth, The deep night, and birds singing, and clouds flying, And sleep, and freedom, and the autumnal earth. We have built a house that is not for Time's throwing. We have gained a peace unshaken by pain for ever. War knows no power. Safe shall be my going, Secretly armed against all death's endeavour; Safe though all safety's lost; safe where men fall; And if these poor limbs die, safest of all.

III. The Dead Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead! There's none of these so lonely and poor of old, But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold. These laid the world away; poured out the red Sweet wine of youth; gave up the years to be Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene, That men call age; and those who would have been, Their sons, they gave, their immortality. Blow, bugles, blow! They brought us, for our dearth, Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain. Honour has come back, as a king, to earth, And paid his subjects with a royal wage; And Nobleness walks in our ways again; And we have come into our heritage.

IV. The Dead These hearts were woven of human joys and cares, Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth. The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs, And sunset, and the colours of the earth. These had seen movements, and heard music; known Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended; Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone; Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended. There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after, Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance, A width, a shining peace, under the night.


When love dies, it takes away
a lot with it. Very nicely written. (Report) Reply


my eyes are full of tears
i cannot believe my eyes and ears
reading your poetry loud
makes me of being human proud (Report) Reply


the dying love would be refresh when a new lease of breathe been reinstated. (Report) Reply

Hosting an event that takes the end of life or bereavement as its theme? Tell us about it and we'll help you promote it. 

Writer and broadcaster Clive James is "saying goodbye" through his poetry. Read Japanese Maple , James' poignant reflection on mortality and the glory of nature. 

Poetry can sometimes help in dealing with grief and loss. The poems here may bring solace and comfort. They may also put into words some of the most difficult and painful emotions and feelings associated with death and bereavement.



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