Dogs of war: Sergeant Stubby, the U.S. Army’s original and.

Posted by 2018 article


When we think about military dogs, we probably picture the Belgian Malinois working with U.S. Navy SEALs, or the Labrador Retriever detecting explosives. Below, we will hear from one such celebrated breed ( my own Shepherd, Zoey, insisted I include the German Shepherd Dog on this list ). But we’ll also hear from some lesser-known breeds that have served our country. Let’s start exactly with whom you’d expect: a small Terrier breed.

I’m thrilled to headline this list of military dogs! I’m a tiny terrier with a mouse-chasing history, but my forefather Smoky was a renowned hero in WWII, attributed with many feats of bravery. For example, he bravely pulled critical wire through narrow pipes, sparing the soldiers a dangerous three-day digging task. Smoky’s companionship was valued as well. History teaches us that dogs are treasured mascots in war. When President Franklin Roosevelt brought his dogs (an Irish Setter and a Scottish Terrier ) everywhere he traveled, soldiers took this as an okay to adopt their own mascot dogs during WWII. And at 4 pounds, my cousin Smoky made an easily transportable mascot.

We’re named after Friedrich Louis Dobermann, a late 19th-century German tax collector who was harassed by thieves and perhaps some indignant tax-payers. Dobermann wanted to develop a well-rounded dog breed for both protection and companionship. Those traits were highly valued by the military. My forefathers worked in WWII as messengers and sentries for the U.S Marine Corps in the Pacific. A memorial statute in Guam, Always Faithful , honors my ancestors who died in service. Kurt, depicted on the statute, was the first canine casualty in Guam.

When we think about military dogs, we probably picture the Belgian Malinois working with U.S. Navy SEALs, or the Labrador Retriever detecting explosives. Below, we will hear from one such celebrated breed ( my own Shepherd, Zoey, insisted I include the German Shepherd Dog on this list ). But we’ll also hear from some lesser-known breeds that have served our country. Let’s start exactly with whom you’d expect: a small Terrier breed.

I’m thrilled to headline this list of military dogs! I’m a tiny terrier with a mouse-chasing history, but my forefather Smoky was a renowned hero in WWII, attributed with many feats of bravery. For example, he bravely pulled critical wire through narrow pipes, sparing the soldiers a dangerous three-day digging task. Smoky’s companionship was valued as well. History teaches us that dogs are treasured mascots in war. When President Franklin Roosevelt brought his dogs (an Irish Setter and a Scottish Terrier ) everywhere he traveled, soldiers took this as an okay to adopt their own mascot dogs during WWII. And at 4 pounds, my cousin Smoky made an easily transportable mascot.

We’re named after Friedrich Louis Dobermann, a late 19th-century German tax collector who was harassed by thieves and perhaps some indignant tax-payers. Dobermann wanted to develop a well-rounded dog breed for both protection and companionship. Those traits were highly valued by the military. My forefathers worked in WWII as messengers and sentries for the U.S Marine Corps in the Pacific. A memorial statute in Guam, Always Faithful , honors my ancestors who died in service. Kurt, depicted on the statute, was the first canine casualty in Guam.

Stubby was a homeless Boston terrier when he adopted enlisted man James Conroy in an Army camp. Their bond was so strong that Conroy smuggled Stubby on board the Army transport. They stayed together in the trenches, where Stubby was adopted by the whole company, and eventually returned home together. Illus. with period photos.

Stubby is a wonderful story not only about the stray dog, and his loving owner but about how Stubby helped in so many ways during WWII. I'm so glad it was saved and written.

Like all of us, today's American Pit Bull Terrier is a product of its past. A great companion animal for humans, the pit bull wasn't always viewed through the media-created bogeyman lenses of today. Indeed, it was once America's sweetheart breed.

While the precise origins of the current American Pit Bull Terrier remain in dispute, with different historians favoring similar but not identical accounts of the past, a few elements seem beyond doubt.

The original "bulldog," used primarily for boar hunting as well as companion and guarding purposes, appears in paintings dating back as far as the 1500s. These dogs look remarkably similar to today's pit bull. They were given the name "bull dogs" because when the horrible sport of bull baiting became popular, they were by far the dog best suited to this purpose.

When we think about military dogs, we probably picture the Belgian Malinois working with U.S. Navy SEALs, or the Labrador Retriever detecting explosives. Below, we will hear from one such celebrated breed ( my own Shepherd, Zoey, insisted I include the German Shepherd Dog on this list ). But we’ll also hear from some lesser-known breeds that have served our country. Let’s start exactly with whom you’d expect: a small Terrier breed.

I’m thrilled to headline this list of military dogs! I’m a tiny terrier with a mouse-chasing history, but my forefather Smoky was a renowned hero in WWII, attributed with many feats of bravery. For example, he bravely pulled critical wire through narrow pipes, sparing the soldiers a dangerous three-day digging task. Smoky’s companionship was valued as well. History teaches us that dogs are treasured mascots in war. When President Franklin Roosevelt brought his dogs (an Irish Setter and a Scottish Terrier ) everywhere he traveled, soldiers took this as an okay to adopt their own mascot dogs during WWII. And at 4 pounds, my cousin Smoky made an easily transportable mascot.

We’re named after Friedrich Louis Dobermann, a late 19th-century German tax collector who was harassed by thieves and perhaps some indignant tax-payers. Dobermann wanted to develop a well-rounded dog breed for both protection and companionship. Those traits were highly valued by the military. My forefathers worked in WWII as messengers and sentries for the U.S Marine Corps in the Pacific. A memorial statute in Guam, Always Faithful , honors my ancestors who died in service. Kurt, depicted on the statute, was the first canine casualty in Guam.

Stubby was a homeless Boston terrier when he adopted enlisted man James Conroy in an Army camp. Their bond was so strong that Conroy smuggled Stubby on board the Army transport. They stayed together in the trenches, where Stubby was adopted by the whole company, and eventually returned home together. Illus. with period photos.

Stubby is a wonderful story not only about the stray dog, and his loving owner but about how Stubby helped in so many ways during WWII. I'm so glad it was saved and written.



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CTMD: Stubby the Military Dog - Connecticut

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