The Last Art

Posted by 2018 article


Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The Last Word provides a private moment to recapture what was never uttered. Hundreds of tightly rolled pieces of paper, dyed red on one end and left untouched on the other are placed white-side out within the honeycomb chambers of a cardboard wall. Participants remove one of the pieces of paper, write down their “last word”, and then replace the paper with the red side exposed. The public may write their own unfinished business or read how other people’s conversations might have ended.

The Last Word was installed at four different locations throughout the fall of 2009 in New York City. Those locations were Spring Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; GMHC in Manhattan and at the Museum at Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan through the end of 2009.

Illegal Art, founded in the summer of 2001, is a collective of artists whose goal is to create participatory-based public art to inspire self-reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is presented or distributed in a method in which participation is simple and encouraged.

The Gallery of Lost Art was an immersive, online exhibition that told the stories of artworks that had disappeared. Destroyed, stolen, discarded, rejected, erased, ephemeral – some of the most significant artworks of the last 100 years have been lost and can no longer be seen.

Curated by Tate , designed by ISO and produced in partnership with Channel 4 , with additional support from the The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC),
the virtual year-long exhibition explored the sometimes extraordinary and sometimes banal circumstances behind the loss of major works of art. Archival images, films, interviews, blogs and essays were laid out for visitors
to examine, revealing the evidence relating to the loss of works by over 40 artists across the twentieth century, including such figures as Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Willem De Kooning, Rachel Whiteread and
Tracey Emin.

To accompany the archive elements and bespoke films around each artist & artwork featured Jennifer Mundy (Head of Collection, Tate) produced a series of in-depth essays for each table.

One noteworthy aspect of growing older is that you find yourself benignly bemused—if you’re lucky—by the constant parade of new technologies that worm their way into your everyday life almost before you know it, pushing other, once-innovative things out of your life as they do so.

In 2005, for instance, I posted a list of “things I no longer use, do, or see.” It included toothpaste in tubes, ketchup in glass bottles, newspapers and magazines on paper, fax machines, going to the post office to mail packages, black discs and cassettes, TV commercials, typewriters, stationery, going to the library, electric can openers, floppy disks, “water-cooler” TV shows, the evening news, dinner parties, and renting videos.

In 2008 I posted another list , this one of “inventions I first encountered when young that are now taken for granted.” It included direct long-distance dialing, fast food, electric car windows, color television, automobile tape decks, digital clocks, photocopiers, and personal calculators.

The following is the calendar for the centennial celebration. For activities that continue beyond one month, the full description is listed at the first mention or click “see description above.”

Jennifer Steinkamp is a world-renowned installation artist who works with video and new media to explore and share ideas about space, motion and perception. She has been the subject of numerous exhibitions at such venues as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, California; the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York; MassMoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts; the Sundance Film Festival, Park City, Utah; and now, the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Her art has toured with the band U2. She is a professor in the Department of Design Media Arts at UCLA, and lives and works in Los Angeles.

Major support has been provided by the William Penn Foundation, with additional support from the Association for Public Art, The Logan Hotel, and individual donors. In-kind support provided by Visit Philadelphia and The Franklin Institute.

Photo: © Jennifer Steinkamp, courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Greengrassi, London.

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Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The Last Word provides a private moment to recapture what was never uttered. Hundreds of tightly rolled pieces of paper, dyed red on one end and left untouched on the other are placed white-side out within the honeycomb chambers of a cardboard wall. Participants remove one of the pieces of paper, write down their “last word”, and then replace the paper with the red side exposed. The public may write their own unfinished business or read how other people’s conversations might have ended.

The Last Word was installed at four different locations throughout the fall of 2009 in New York City. Those locations were Spring Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; GMHC in Manhattan and at the Museum at Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan through the end of 2009.

Illegal Art, founded in the summer of 2001, is a collective of artists whose goal is to create participatory-based public art to inspire self-reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is presented or distributed in a method in which participation is simple and encouraged.

Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The Last Word provides a private moment to recapture what was never uttered. Hundreds of tightly rolled pieces of paper, dyed red on one end and left untouched on the other are placed white-side out within the honeycomb chambers of a cardboard wall. Participants remove one of the pieces of paper, write down their “last word”, and then replace the paper with the red side exposed. The public may write their own unfinished business or read how other people’s conversations might have ended.

The Last Word was installed at four different locations throughout the fall of 2009 in New York City. Those locations were Spring Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; GMHC in Manhattan and at the Museum at Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan through the end of 2009.

Illegal Art, founded in the summer of 2001, is a collective of artists whose goal is to create participatory-based public art to inspire self-reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is presented or distributed in a method in which participation is simple and encouraged.

The Gallery of Lost Art was an immersive, online exhibition that told the stories of artworks that had disappeared. Destroyed, stolen, discarded, rejected, erased, ephemeral – some of the most significant artworks of the last 100 years have been lost and can no longer be seen.

Curated by Tate , designed by ISO and produced in partnership with Channel 4 , with additional support from the The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC),
the virtual year-long exhibition explored the sometimes extraordinary and sometimes banal circumstances behind the loss of major works of art. Archival images, films, interviews, blogs and essays were laid out for visitors
to examine, revealing the evidence relating to the loss of works by over 40 artists across the twentieth century, including such figures as Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Willem De Kooning, Rachel Whiteread and
Tracey Emin.

To accompany the archive elements and bespoke films around each artist & artwork featured Jennifer Mundy (Head of Collection, Tate) produced a series of in-depth essays for each table.

One noteworthy aspect of growing older is that you find yourself benignly bemused—if you’re lucky—by the constant parade of new technologies that worm their way into your everyday life almost before you know it, pushing other, once-innovative things out of your life as they do so.

In 2005, for instance, I posted a list of “things I no longer use, do, or see.” It included toothpaste in tubes, ketchup in glass bottles, newspapers and magazines on paper, fax machines, going to the post office to mail packages, black discs and cassettes, TV commercials, typewriters, stationery, going to the library, electric can openers, floppy disks, “water-cooler” TV shows, the evening news, dinner parties, and renting videos.

In 2008 I posted another list , this one of “inventions I first encountered when young that are now taken for granted.” It included direct long-distance dialing, fast food, electric car windows, color television, automobile tape decks, digital clocks, photocopiers, and personal calculators.

Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The Last Word provides a private moment to recapture what was never uttered. Hundreds of tightly rolled pieces of paper, dyed red on one end and left untouched on the other are placed white-side out within the honeycomb chambers of a cardboard wall. Participants remove one of the pieces of paper, write down their “last word”, and then replace the paper with the red side exposed. The public may write their own unfinished business or read how other people’s conversations might have ended.

The Last Word was installed at four different locations throughout the fall of 2009 in New York City. Those locations were Spring Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; GMHC in Manhattan and at the Museum at Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan through the end of 2009.

Illegal Art, founded in the summer of 2001, is a collective of artists whose goal is to create participatory-based public art to inspire self-reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is presented or distributed in a method in which participation is simple and encouraged.

The Gallery of Lost Art was an immersive, online exhibition that told the stories of artworks that had disappeared. Destroyed, stolen, discarded, rejected, erased, ephemeral – some of the most significant artworks of the last 100 years have been lost and can no longer be seen.

Curated by Tate , designed by ISO and produced in partnership with Channel 4 , with additional support from the The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC),
the virtual year-long exhibition explored the sometimes extraordinary and sometimes banal circumstances behind the loss of major works of art. Archival images, films, interviews, blogs and essays were laid out for visitors
to examine, revealing the evidence relating to the loss of works by over 40 artists across the twentieth century, including such figures as Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Willem De Kooning, Rachel Whiteread and
Tracey Emin.

To accompany the archive elements and bespoke films around each artist & artwork featured Jennifer Mundy (Head of Collection, Tate) produced a series of in-depth essays for each table.

One noteworthy aspect of growing older is that you find yourself benignly bemused—if you’re lucky—by the constant parade of new technologies that worm their way into your everyday life almost before you know it, pushing other, once-innovative things out of your life as they do so.

In 2005, for instance, I posted a list of “things I no longer use, do, or see.” It included toothpaste in tubes, ketchup in glass bottles, newspapers and magazines on paper, fax machines, going to the post office to mail packages, black discs and cassettes, TV commercials, typewriters, stationery, going to the library, electric can openers, floppy disks, “water-cooler” TV shows, the evening news, dinner parties, and renting videos.

In 2008 I posted another list , this one of “inventions I first encountered when young that are now taken for granted.” It included direct long-distance dialing, fast food, electric car windows, color television, automobile tape decks, digital clocks, photocopiers, and personal calculators.

The following is the calendar for the centennial celebration. For activities that continue beyond one month, the full description is listed at the first mention or click “see description above.”

Jennifer Steinkamp is a world-renowned installation artist who works with video and new media to explore and share ideas about space, motion and perception. She has been the subject of numerous exhibitions at such venues as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, California; the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York; MassMoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts; the Sundance Film Festival, Park City, Utah; and now, the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Her art has toured with the band U2. She is a professor in the Department of Design Media Arts at UCLA, and lives and works in Los Angeles.

Major support has been provided by the William Penn Foundation, with additional support from the Association for Public Art, The Logan Hotel, and individual donors. In-kind support provided by Visit Philadelphia and The Franklin Institute.

Photo: © Jennifer Steinkamp, courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Greengrassi, London.

Garry Neill Kennedy is a Canadian conceptual artist who was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia in 2000 and a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts in 2004. From 1967 to 1990 he was President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The Last Word provides a private moment to recapture what was never uttered. Hundreds of tightly rolled pieces of paper, dyed red on one end and left untouched on the other are placed white-side out within the honeycomb chambers of a cardboard wall. Participants remove one of the pieces of paper, write down their “last word”, and then replace the paper with the red side exposed. The public may write their own unfinished business or read how other people’s conversations might have ended.

The Last Word was installed at four different locations throughout the fall of 2009 in New York City. Those locations were Spring Gallery in Brooklyn, New York; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; GMHC in Manhattan and at the Museum at Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan through the end of 2009.

Illegal Art, founded in the summer of 2001, is a collective of artists whose goal is to create participatory-based public art to inspire self-reflection, thought and human connection. Each piece is presented or distributed in a method in which participation is simple and encouraged.

The Gallery of Lost Art was an immersive, online exhibition that told the stories of artworks that had disappeared. Destroyed, stolen, discarded, rejected, erased, ephemeral – some of the most significant artworks of the last 100 years have been lost and can no longer be seen.

Curated by Tate , designed by ISO and produced in partnership with Channel 4 , with additional support from the The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC),
the virtual year-long exhibition explored the sometimes extraordinary and sometimes banal circumstances behind the loss of major works of art. Archival images, films, interviews, blogs and essays were laid out for visitors
to examine, revealing the evidence relating to the loss of works by over 40 artists across the twentieth century, including such figures as Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Willem De Kooning, Rachel Whiteread and
Tracey Emin.

To accompany the archive elements and bespoke films around each artist & artwork featured Jennifer Mundy (Head of Collection, Tate) produced a series of in-depth essays for each table.



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