Marcus Aurelius | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

  • Brunt, P. A. “Marcus Aurelius in His Meditations .” Journal of Roman Studies 64 (1974): 1–20. DOI: 10.2307/299256 E-mail Citation »

    A classic overview of the Meditations . Scholarly and presupposes knowledge of Greek in places but still accessible and engaging for students. Recently reprinted in Brunt’s Studies in Stoicism , pp. 360–393. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

    This is a course for those who have some experience of mindfulness, and wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding. The sessions are designed to reconnect you with mindfulness practice, and perhaps to loosen the grip of some confirmed ideas about how you should be doing, allowing more freedom to be and to act.

    What is it we’re trying to do when we bring the mind gently back to the breath, or raw sound, for instance? What actually happens when the mind wanders off on a tangent?  And why do things feel unsatisfactory? We will be looking again at the practices learnt in mindfulness courses, understanding them on a deeper level and gaining some insight into how they fit together, and their roots in Buddhist practice.

    Click here to book:  Booking form Revisiting Mindfulness 2018   or for more information email  [email protected]   or call Barbara on 07811 934415.

    Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

    • Brunt, P. A. “Marcus Aurelius in His Meditations .” Journal of Roman Studies 64 (1974): 1–20. DOI: 10.2307/299256 E-mail Citation »

      A classic overview of the Meditations . Scholarly and presupposes knowledge of Greek in places but still accessible and engaging for students. Recently reprinted in Brunt’s Studies in Stoicism , pp. 360–393. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

      This is a course for those who have some experience of mindfulness, and wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding. The sessions are designed to reconnect you with mindfulness practice, and perhaps to loosen the grip of some confirmed ideas about how you should be doing, allowing more freedom to be and to act.

      What is it we’re trying to do when we bring the mind gently back to the breath, or raw sound, for instance? What actually happens when the mind wanders off on a tangent?  And why do things feel unsatisfactory? We will be looking again at the practices learnt in mindfulness courses, understanding them on a deeper level and gaining some insight into how they fit together, and their roots in Buddhist practice.

      Click here to book:  Booking form Revisiting Mindfulness 2018   or for more information email  [email protected]   or call Barbara on 07811 934415.

      Combining ancient wisdom and 21st century science, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is proving to be a powerful tool to help prevent relapse in depression and the after effects of trauma.

      The word mindfulness means compassionate and lucid awareness, a sense of knowing what is happening in the external and internal world as it is happening. Most of us are more used to its opposite: mind less ness – times when we are not really conscious of what is going on, when we are most liable to make mistakes. Mind ful ness means waking up and checking in to what’s happening so we can make wise choices.

      In its more common usage in recent clinical literature, it has come to mean the awareness that emerges as a by-product of cultivating three related skills: (a) intentionally paying attention to moment-by moment events as they unfold in the internal and external world, (b) noticing habitual reactions to such events, often characterized by aversion or attachment (commonly resulting in over-thinking), and (c) cultivating the ability to respond to events, and to reactions to them, with an attitude of open curiosity and compassion.

      Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Aliquam ligula odio, euismod ut aliquam et, vestibulum nec risus. Nulla viverra, arcu et iaculis consequat, justo diam ornare tellus, semper ultrices tellus nunc eu tellus.

      • Brunt, P. A. “Marcus Aurelius in His Meditations .” Journal of Roman Studies 64 (1974): 1–20. DOI: 10.2307/299256 E-mail Citation »

        A classic overview of the Meditations . Scholarly and presupposes knowledge of Greek in places but still accessible and engaging for students. Recently reprinted in Brunt’s Studies in Stoicism , pp. 360–393. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.



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meditation | Definition of meditation in English by Oxford.

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