Working at Elections - NSW Electoral Commission

Posted by 2018 article


The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka will stand for three councils in the upcoming local government elections, fielding 61 candidates. Elections for 341 local bodies, including municipalities, urban councils and Pradeshiya Sabha (divisional councils), are scheduled for February 10.

The SEP is fielding a slate of 23 candidates for the Kolonnawa Urban Council, near the capital city of Colombo, headed by Vilani Peiris, a long-standing SEP political committee member. A slate of 24, led by SEP political committee member M. Thevarajah, is standing for the Ambagamuwa Pradeshiya Sabha near Hatton in the central plantation district. P. Sambandan, another SEP political committee member, is leading a list of 16 candidates for Kayts in the war-ravaged northern Jaffna Peninsula.

Our candidates include party members and supporters drawn from workers and youth who have unblemished records of fighting for international socialist policies within the working class, youth and rural poor.

You’ll often hear the criticism of the Green Party that it’s too middle class from both the inside and outside of the party. Over the last few conferences there have even been dedicated fringes to discuss the problem of the unfair perception and the rather more fair reality that the middle classes are over-represented. As someone with a class chip on my shoulder, which I do my best to disguise but is oh so very real, I’ve often felt that many members simply aren’t comfortable around working class people.

Thankfully no one has yet managed to pass a motion to conference keeping us lower orders out and our elected representatives are often reasonably representative of the public at large. Of our two London Assembly members, for example, one was an archaeologist but Darren Johnson used to work in a chip shop. A hero to the class indeed!

So while it’s good that we have working class activists in the party and have social democratic policies that talk about housing, jobs and the rest of it, we still have a way to go before we have a leader with dirt under their fingernails that didn’t come from the allotment.

On Thursday morning the "Today" show had a segment with a psycologist who was there to guide parents on how to explain Hillary Clinton's loss to their children.

"Well that is interesting, they sure didn't have a child psycologist on to explain to my children the loss of Mitt Romney, or John McCain. You just simply did not have that," said a suburban mother sitting in the waiting room of a doctor's office with the morning show streaming on the television.

The young mother, an IT professional who lives in Pittsburgh, the "Paris of Appalachia," said she was stunned once again how the media still don't get people outside of the big cities.

The Campaigns & Candidates Working Group is charged with facilitating the electoral work of the party , including to:

Any Green Party member can participate in the CCWG. The CCWG meets by teleconference and in person at Green Party of California General Assemblies . There is also a CCWG email list open to registered Greens (only) in California.  Subscribe here . Working group members earn voting privileges when they attend at lease two working group meetings within two years. 

CCWG Co-coordinators: Pamela Spevack and David Cobb ; Coordinating Committee Liaison  June Brashares . Please include your name and county.
 

The kernel of truth on which this story is built is that the Democrats did not win a majority of white working class votes in this election. That is, of course, true, but can also be said of every presidential election since 1964. Trump did better among these voters, but the reasons for that go well beyond anything the Democratic Party did this year or in any other recent election.

Despite this, it is true that many Democratic presidential candidates in recent years were not of the white working class and therefore not familiar to them. Michael Dukakis, John Kerry, Barack Obama and the 2016 iteration of Hillary Clinton are not the kind of people who would fit in well at at UAW hall or a blue collar bar. Their policy proposals, however along with those of Democratic leaders in Congress and other recent Democratic presidential candidates, tell a different story.

The truth is that the Democrats continued to reach out to white working class voters, and to offer policies aimed at helping them, long after these voters abandoned the Democratic Party. What the Democratic Party did not do, is walk away from their, admittedly sometimes inadequate, commitment to civil rights for people of color, women and LGBT voters. Those commitments, and the willingness of an increasingly emboldened Republican Party to exploit hatred and fear at every turn, are what has cost the Democrats white working class votes.

The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka will stand for three councils in the upcoming local government elections, fielding 61 candidates. Elections for 341 local bodies, including municipalities, urban councils and Pradeshiya Sabha (divisional councils), are scheduled for February 10.

The SEP is fielding a slate of 23 candidates for the Kolonnawa Urban Council, near the capital city of Colombo, headed by Vilani Peiris, a long-standing SEP political committee member. A slate of 24, led by SEP political committee member M. Thevarajah, is standing for the Ambagamuwa Pradeshiya Sabha near Hatton in the central plantation district. P. Sambandan, another SEP political committee member, is leading a list of 16 candidates for Kayts in the war-ravaged northern Jaffna Peninsula.

Our candidates include party members and supporters drawn from workers and youth who have unblemished records of fighting for international socialist policies within the working class, youth and rural poor.

You’ll often hear the criticism of the Green Party that it’s too middle class from both the inside and outside of the party. Over the last few conferences there have even been dedicated fringes to discuss the problem of the unfair perception and the rather more fair reality that the middle classes are over-represented. As someone with a class chip on my shoulder, which I do my best to disguise but is oh so very real, I’ve often felt that many members simply aren’t comfortable around working class people.

Thankfully no one has yet managed to pass a motion to conference keeping us lower orders out and our elected representatives are often reasonably representative of the public at large. Of our two London Assembly members, for example, one was an archaeologist but Darren Johnson used to work in a chip shop. A hero to the class indeed!

So while it’s good that we have working class activists in the party and have social democratic policies that talk about housing, jobs and the rest of it, we still have a way to go before we have a leader with dirt under their fingernails that didn’t come from the allotment.

The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka will stand for three councils in the upcoming local government elections, fielding 61 candidates. Elections for 341 local bodies, including municipalities, urban councils and Pradeshiya Sabha (divisional councils), are scheduled for February 10.

The SEP is fielding a slate of 23 candidates for the Kolonnawa Urban Council, near the capital city of Colombo, headed by Vilani Peiris, a long-standing SEP political committee member. A slate of 24, led by SEP political committee member M. Thevarajah, is standing for the Ambagamuwa Pradeshiya Sabha near Hatton in the central plantation district. P. Sambandan, another SEP political committee member, is leading a list of 16 candidates for Kayts in the war-ravaged northern Jaffna Peninsula.

Our candidates include party members and supporters drawn from workers and youth who have unblemished records of fighting for international socialist policies within the working class, youth and rural poor.

You’ll often hear the criticism of the Green Party that it’s too middle class from both the inside and outside of the party. Over the last few conferences there have even been dedicated fringes to discuss the problem of the unfair perception and the rather more fair reality that the middle classes are over-represented. As someone with a class chip on my shoulder, which I do my best to disguise but is oh so very real, I’ve often felt that many members simply aren’t comfortable around working class people.

Thankfully no one has yet managed to pass a motion to conference keeping us lower orders out and our elected representatives are often reasonably representative of the public at large. Of our two London Assembly members, for example, one was an archaeologist but Darren Johnson used to work in a chip shop. A hero to the class indeed!

So while it’s good that we have working class activists in the party and have social democratic policies that talk about housing, jobs and the rest of it, we still have a way to go before we have a leader with dirt under their fingernails that didn’t come from the allotment.

On Thursday morning the "Today" show had a segment with a psycologist who was there to guide parents on how to explain Hillary Clinton's loss to their children.

"Well that is interesting, they sure didn't have a child psycologist on to explain to my children the loss of Mitt Romney, or John McCain. You just simply did not have that," said a suburban mother sitting in the waiting room of a doctor's office with the morning show streaming on the television.

The young mother, an IT professional who lives in Pittsburgh, the "Paris of Appalachia," said she was stunned once again how the media still don't get people outside of the big cities.

The Campaigns & Candidates Working Group is charged with facilitating the electoral work of the party , including to:

Any Green Party member can participate in the CCWG. The CCWG meets by teleconference and in person at Green Party of California General Assemblies . There is also a CCWG email list open to registered Greens (only) in California.  Subscribe here . Working group members earn voting privileges when they attend at lease two working group meetings within two years. 

CCWG Co-coordinators: Pamela Spevack and David Cobb ; Coordinating Committee Liaison  June Brashares . Please include your name and county.
 

The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka will stand for three councils in the upcoming local government elections, fielding 61 candidates. Elections for 341 local bodies, including municipalities, urban councils and Pradeshiya Sabha (divisional councils), are scheduled for February 10.

The SEP is fielding a slate of 23 candidates for the Kolonnawa Urban Council, near the capital city of Colombo, headed by Vilani Peiris, a long-standing SEP political committee member. A slate of 24, led by SEP political committee member M. Thevarajah, is standing for the Ambagamuwa Pradeshiya Sabha near Hatton in the central plantation district. P. Sambandan, another SEP political committee member, is leading a list of 16 candidates for Kayts in the war-ravaged northern Jaffna Peninsula.

Our candidates include party members and supporters drawn from workers and youth who have unblemished records of fighting for international socialist policies within the working class, youth and rural poor.

The Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in Sri Lanka will stand for three councils in the upcoming local government elections, fielding 61 candidates. Elections for 341 local bodies, including municipalities, urban councils and Pradeshiya Sabha (divisional councils), are scheduled for February 10.

The SEP is fielding a slate of 23 candidates for the Kolonnawa Urban Council, near the capital city of Colombo, headed by Vilani Peiris, a long-standing SEP political committee member. A slate of 24, led by SEP political committee member M. Thevarajah, is standing for the Ambagamuwa Pradeshiya Sabha near Hatton in the central plantation district. P. Sambandan, another SEP political committee member, is leading a list of 16 candidates for Kayts in the war-ravaged northern Jaffna Peninsula.

Our candidates include party members and supporters drawn from workers and youth who have unblemished records of fighting for international socialist policies within the working class, youth and rural poor.

You’ll often hear the criticism of the Green Party that it’s too middle class from both the inside and outside of the party. Over the last few conferences there have even been dedicated fringes to discuss the problem of the unfair perception and the rather more fair reality that the middle classes are over-represented. As someone with a class chip on my shoulder, which I do my best to disguise but is oh so very real, I’ve often felt that many members simply aren’t comfortable around working class people.

Thankfully no one has yet managed to pass a motion to conference keeping us lower orders out and our elected representatives are often reasonably representative of the public at large. Of our two London Assembly members, for example, one was an archaeologist but Darren Johnson used to work in a chip shop. A hero to the class indeed!

So while it’s good that we have working class activists in the party and have social democratic policies that talk about housing, jobs and the rest of it, we still have a way to go before we have a leader with dirt under their fingernails that didn’t come from the allotment.

On Thursday morning the "Today" show had a segment with a psycologist who was there to guide parents on how to explain Hillary Clinton's loss to their children.

"Well that is interesting, they sure didn't have a child psycologist on to explain to my children the loss of Mitt Romney, or John McCain. You just simply did not have that," said a suburban mother sitting in the waiting room of a doctor's office with the morning show streaming on the television.

The young mother, an IT professional who lives in Pittsburgh, the "Paris of Appalachia," said she was stunned once again how the media still don't get people outside of the big cities.



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